Coffee production

This site is dedicated to one of the most precious human invention - the magic beverage named COFFEE! For all the coffee lovers we've collected some interesting facts about coffee and coffee business and history. And so... Thai cuisine is one of the most popular cuisine in the world. Australian chef David Thompson, a prolific chef and expert on Thai food, observed that unlike many other cuisines: "Thai food ain't about simplicity. One type, which is indigenous to Thailand, is the highly prized, sweet-smelling jasmine rice (khao hom mali). Very often, regular restaurants will also feature a selection of freshly made "rice curry" dishes on their menu for single customers. Eateries and shops that are specialized in pre-made food, are the usual place to go to for having a meal this way.

Early History

The first coffee crops were planted in the eastern part of the country. In 1835 the first commercial production was registered with 2,560 green coffee bags that were exported from the port of Cucuta, near the border with Venezuela. The most notable influence from the West must be the introduction of the chili pepper from the Americas in the 16th or 17th century. Some westerners think it's a jumble of flavours, but to a Thai that's important, it's the complexity they delight in". Traditionally, the majority of ethnic Thai people ate with their hands like the people of India. Like a complex musical chord it's got to have a smooth surface but it doesn't matter what's happening underneath. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter and spicy. The production of these sectors went into period of decline when the respective bonanza of their international prices terminated, hence a true industrial consolidation was prevented.

The crisis

The crisis that affected the large estates brought with it one of the most significant changes of the Colombian coffee industry. Chopsticks were foreign utensils to most ethnic groups in Thailand with the exception of the Thai Chinese, and a few other cultures such as the Akha people, who are recent arrivals from Yunnan Province, China. They are tom yam goong (4th), pad thai (5th), som tam (6th), massaman curry (10th), green curry (19th), Thai fried rice (24th) and moo nam tok (36th). In Latin America, dishes may be claimed or designated as a "plato nacional" although in many cases recipes transcend national borders with only minor variations. Thai farmers historically have cultivated tens of thousands of rice varieties. Like most other Asian cuisines, rice is the staple grain of Thai cuisine.

National Federation

The National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia is a non-profit business association, popularly known for its "Juan Valdez" marketing campaign. The federation was founded in 1927 as a business cooperative that promotes the production and exportation of Colombian coffee. It currently represents more than 500,000 producers, most of whom are small family owned farms. The federation supports research and development in the production of coffee through grants to local universities and through federation sponsored research institutes.

The other elements would include a clear soup (perhaps a spicy tom yam or a mellow tom chuet), a curry or stew (essentially any dish identified with the kaeng prefix), a deep-fried dish and a stir-fried dish of meat, fish, seafood or vegetables. Western influences, starting in 1511 CE when the first diplomatic mission from the Portuguese arrived at the court of Ayutthaya, have created dishes such as foi thong, the Thai adaptation of the Portuguese fios de ovos, and sangkhaya, where coconut milk replaces unavailable cow's milk in making a custard.[17] These dishes were said to have been brought to Thailand in the 17th century by Maria Guyomar de Pinha, a woman of mixed Japanese-Portuguese-Bengali ancestry who was born in Ayutthaya, and became the wife of Constantine Phaulkon, the Greek adviser of King Narai. These venues have a large display showing the different dishes from which one can choose. It is now one of the most important ingredients in Thai cuisine, together with rice.[18] During the Columbian Exchange, Portuguese and Spanish ships brought new crops from the Americas including tomatoes, corn, papaya, pea eggplants, pineapple, pumpkins, culantro, cashews, and peanuts. The Chinese also introduced the use of a wok for cooking, the technique of deep-frying and stir-frying dishes, several types of noodles, taochiao (fermented bean paste), soy sauces, and tofu.[13] The cuisines of India and Persia, brought first by traders, and later settlers from these regions, with their use of dried spices, gave rise to Thai adaptations and dishes such as kaeng kari (yellow curry)[14] and kaeng matsaman (massaman curry).

The federation also monitors production to ensure export quality standards are met. The Federation was founded with three objectives: 1) to protect the industry, 2) to study its problems, and 3) to further its interests.[15] The Juan Valdez branding concept was developed in 1981 to distinguish 100% Colombian coffee from coffee blended with beans from other countries. The trademark made its first TV appearance in 1983 featuring a country farmer carrying coffee on his mule.